question on if these leds are legit or a rip off [Archive] - GrandAmGT.com Forum

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Gizm0815
09-09-2005, 11:59 AM
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/NEW-3-Million-Color-UFO-LED-UnderCar-UnderBody-Kit_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQcategoryZ33713QQitemZ7998728 887QQrdZ1QQsspagenameZWDVW

the guy is selling these and they look similar to the iceled kit but i know theres a huge difference in price. didnt know if its a legit deal or if this is just some cheap ****ty knock off there is also a video on the page of the leds in action.

thanks for any help and sorry if this is posted in the wrong spot didnt know where to put it.

joe

freakydeaky
09-09-2005, 12:19 PM
there's been some complaints about these guys.... http://forums.linear1.org/index.php/topic,340.new.html ... this is all i could find on lck world trade centre..... i would do alot of investigation before i'd purchase them.... smells fishy

MSJHWT
09-09-2005, 02:36 PM
there's been some complaints about these guys.... http://forums.linear1.org/index.php/topic,340.new.html ... this is all i could find on lck world trade centre..... i would do alot of investigation before i'd purchase them.... smells fishy
Uhm, just kinda curious as to what this link has to do with anything about that seller not being legit?
The guy bought LEDs from the seller, and had too much amperage running though his LEDs (he says in the last post he tested his current and was running double what he should've been, causing the LED failure).
As for the kit on eBay, it does look a lot like the ICELEDs....probably the old addage you get what you pay for might apply though. For example, no-name neons for $50-60 vs a Gold Kit for appox. $250, this might not end up being as bright, have as rich colors, etc etc

MantaGreen97
09-10-2005, 05:32 PM
The guy bought LEDs from the seller, and had too much amperage running though his LEDs (he says in the last post he tested his current and was running double what he should've been, causing the LED failure).


That doesn't make any sense at all--there is no way to be "running double" the current he should have been through a light, LED or otherwise. Current is drawn by the light from the power source, you can't "pump" current into anything wrongly. Electrical loads draw current from the voltage they are given from the source, you can supply more voltage than required but not current.

If you supplied only half the voltage required for the bulb's rating, then it could draw twice the current (if it would still light), but still you aren't "giving" more current, the bulb is simply drawing more with a decreased voltage.

The only way the bulbs would be drawing double the current they were rated for is if the voltage was not correct or if the rating were wrong, or if you hit it with lightning or something (but yeah then the voltage isn't correct, lol).

MSJHWT
09-11-2005, 10:25 PM
bleh more voltage then, I'm not a light guy, I just knew the thread delt with him hooking it up wrong not that seller doing something wrong, you shoulda gone and read the thread :P
From that thread:

I got 90 mA. It should have been 40mA right? I have 2 series of LEDs.

I also checked the power supply. I got 19v. It should have been 12v

DarkKnight
09-18-2005, 01:22 PM
That doesn't make any sense at all--there is no way to be "running double" the current he should have been through a light, LED or otherwise. Current is drawn by the light from the power source, you can't "pump" current into anything wrongly. Electrical loads draw current from the voltage they are given from the source, you can supply more voltage than required but not current.

If you supplied only half the voltage required for the bulb's rating, then it could draw twice the current (if it would still light), but still you aren't "giving" more current, the bulb is simply drawing more with a decreased voltage.

The only way the bulbs would be drawing double the current they were rated for is if the voltage was not correct or if the rating were wrong, or if you hit it with lightning or something (but yeah then the voltage isn't correct, lol).


He had current limiting resistors in place. What I understood from the thread was they think the resistors were undersized, or the power supply over volted.

LEDs don't work exactly like light bulbs. Without proper resistors to limit the current flow, LEDs would very quickly get overdriven by too much current. I don't feel like explaining the physics behind it, use wikipedia if you really need to know. Suffice it to say that LEDs and bulbs *are* different, and you can "over current" (a.k.a. overdrive) LEDs.