Bleeding ABS Brakes [Archive] - GrandAmGT.com Forum

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Mowat_1
02-03-2006, 06:49 AM
I need to change the front brake caliper on a 2000 GR AM . Is there any special technique that needs to be done to bleed the brake line with ABS /ETS braking system or can you just do manual method, I.E. pump brake pedal, hold while buddy opens bleed screw.

coupe
02-03-2006, 06:55 AM
Ive never bled the brakes on my GA but that is how i would do it if i was going to.

manic mechanic
02-05-2006, 09:54 AM
Just try and minimize the loss of brake fluid when removing the old caliper. When removing the banjo bolt, (the bolt that holds the flexible brake line to the caliper) do it quickly and have the new caliper handy and ready to install.

As a precautionary measure you can always slip a small section of rubber tubing in place of the banjo bolt through the hole of the flexible brake line to stop the flow of brake fluid while to tending to the tasks of cleaning the banjo bolt and preparing the new copper washers for installation. The rubber tube will seal the hole within the squared off hose fitting (brass) preventing the loss of even more brake fluid.

If you introduce air into the ABS system by completely draining the brake fluid reservoir, you will have to use specialized equipment to open certain valves and solenoids within the ABS system to completely bleed the air out.

You can always top up the brake fluid reservoir before you begin removing the original caliper in order to give you more of a cushion should you lose more brake fluid than originally expected.

digitalballz
02-05-2006, 03:56 PM
Yes the old manual method works. Pump it...... Hold it...... sounds kinda like porn!!

eaglesrealm
02-21-2006, 10:40 PM
Just try and minimize the loss of brake fluid when removing the old caliper. When removing the banjo bolt, (the bolt that holds the flexible brake line to the caliper) do it quickly and have the new caliper handy and ready to install.

As a precautionary measure you can always slip a small section of rubber tubing in place of the banjo bolt through the hole of the flexible brake line to stop the flow of brake fluid while to tending to the tasks of cleaning the banjo bolt and preparing the new copper washers for installation. The rubber tube will seal the hole within the squared off hose fitting (brass) preventing the loss of even more brake fluid.

If you introduce air into the ABS system by completely draining the brake fluid reservoir, you will have to use specialized equipment to open certain valves and solenoids within the ABS system to completely bleed the air out.

You can always top up the brake fluid reservoir before you begin removing the original caliper in order to give you more of a cushion should you lose more brake fluid than originally expected.

Ummmm...I don't have the schematic in front of me, but I don't believe you will need any special tools and can bleed as normal. AS LONG AS you do the bleed fully and completely before initiating any sort of ABS/TC event. All ABS systems have manual push thru in the event of a failure. Thus, the normally open channels of the valve can have air pass through them. The bad part to have air would ONLY get air if you cycled the ABS with air in the line OR you cracked open one of the two solenoids, etc that lead into the back 1/2 of the unit.

manic mechanic
02-22-2006, 07:07 PM
Ummmm...I don't have the schematic in front of me, but I don't believe you will need any special tools and can bleed as normal. AS LONG AS you do the bleed fully and completely before initiating any sort of ABS/TC event. All ABS systems have manual push thru in the event of a failure. Thus, the normally open channels of the valve can have air pass through them. The bad part to have air would ONLY get air if you cycled the ABS with air in the line OR you cracked open one of the two solenoids, etc that lead into the back 1/2 of the unit.

Or if your partner (the pedal pusher) decides to turn the key so he could listen to the radio and inadvertently cycles the ABS system (at the first turn of the key as always) while you were in the process of refilling your master cylinder.

Keeping as much fluid as possible in the reservoir is just my way of playing it safe.

eaglesrealm
02-22-2006, 07:43 PM
Or if your partner (the pedal pusher) decides to turn the key so he could listen to the radio and inadvertently cycles the ABS system (at the first turn of the key as always) while you were in the process of refilling your master cylinder.

Keeping as much fluid as possible in the reservoir is just my way of playing it safe.


I am not saying to not try and keep fluid in the tubes to the MC ports. However, the system check of the ABS takes place at some low speed, not at key turn. AT least in most systems - including ours I believe.