Air Conditioning: HC-12a refill [Archive] - GrandAmGT.com Forum

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Mike Jung
08-25-2008, 10:42 AM
Our GA's come filled with R-134a refrigerant for the AC.

Has anyone used HC-12a as a refill, when it was low on refrigerant of R-134a ?

HC-12a is suppose to leak out less than R-134a.
(The molecules are suppose to be 4x bigger than the R-134a ones.)

I am having mine refilled with HC-12a (after taking out the R-134a refrigerant) & a leak dye.

Anyone else used HC-12a before ?
Pro's & Con's of it ?

Mike Jung
08-25-2008, 10:49 AM
HC12a System Versus R134a System (http://www.hotrodhotline.com/feature/tech/04hc12a/)

Mike Jung
08-25-2008, 12:49 PM
I guess US owners are sh1t out of luck on HC-12a.

EPA: Legal Status of HC-12a , DURACOOL 12a , and OZ-12 (http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/refrigerants/hc-12a.html)

Canada FTW!?

silvergtjrad
08-25-2008, 05:29 PM
Use 134. Mixing refrigerants isnt a good thing. They evaporate at different temperatures and can really screw up your AC

Mike Jung
08-25-2008, 06:24 PM
The garage decided to refill the system with R-134a & a leak dye instead.

& for me to bring it back when it leaks out.
So they can try to find/fix the leak.
(They won't charge me again for finding the leak & a re-fill; since they already charged it to me this time, & didn't find the small leak. As long as I bring it back by next May '09.)

& if they can't find the leak: They fill take out the R-134a; & refill it with the HC-12a.

Mike Jung
08-25-2008, 06:25 PM
Use 134. Mixing refrigerants isnt a good thing. They evaporate at different temperatures and can really screw up your AC
Jared,

Since you work in the HVAC business...

What is wrong with emptying the R-134a, & refilling with HC-12a ?

Malaclypse
08-25-2008, 07:45 PM
Jared,

Since you work in the HVAC business...

What is wrong with emptying the R-134a, & refilling with HC-12a ?

If a thorough enough evacuation of the system is performed there shouldn't be any issues with refrigerant compatability.

However, bear in mind that the system may not work as efficiently because it is designed around R134a. This means that the restricting orifice to create the pressure differential may not provide the correct pressure for the refrigerant entering the evaporator. This means it may not boil off as well which results in poor cooling.

Its best and easiest to find and fix the leak. Make sure that they check the service ports. Its easy to overlook as a leak point when the a/c service machine is hooked up to the ports and you're looking for a leak. Dye in the caps after they've been cleaned is usually a good indicator.

silvergtjrad
08-25-2008, 08:07 PM
Jared,

Since you work in the HVAC business...

What is wrong with emptying the R-134a, & refilling with HC-12a ?

Im not familiar with 12a, but there are a lot of things that could cause you some problems. First of all would be the oil. Different refrigerants require the use of different lubricants. If there is much of a difference in the saturation temperatures, the orifice may need to be changed as well. After a quick google search, I have found that 12a is flamable... not something I would like to keep in a moving vehicle. The amount of charge will different, and isnt something to trust with some dummy at pep boys.

I havent read the whole thread, but I would personally stick with r134a. GM designed the system to use that refrigerant, and you would be better off keeping it that way. If this is a seasoned technician with some good automotive AC experience, and its what he is recommending then go for it I guess.

Just my $.02

Mike Jung
08-25-2008, 08:12 PM
Im not familiar with 12a, but there are a lot of things that could cause you some problems. First of all would be the oil. Different refrigerants require the use of different lubricants. If there is much of a difference in the saturation temperatures, the orifice may need to be changed as well. After a quick google search, I have found that 12a is flamable... not something I would like to keep in a moving vehicle. The amount of charge will different, and isnt something to trust with some dummy at pep boys.

I havent read the whole thread, but I would personally stick with r134a. GM designed the system to use that refrigerant, and you would be better off keeping it that way. If this is a seasoned technician with some good automotive AC experience, and its what he is recommending then go for it I guess.

Just my $.02
Thanks for your (& everyone else's) feed back.

lone_wolf025
08-25-2008, 08:59 PM
I took a couple classes on auto HVAC systems and HC was basically portrayed as bad juju. My instructor would say "Its a BOMB!" anytime the refrigerant identifier found HC in the system. But, stateside, the only real option is R-134a as R-12 is just way too expensive to recharge.